Monthly Archives: March 2014

Office Etiquette: Humour Has It’s Place…

In my book, “Unforgiving, Memoir of an Asperger Teen”, I talk about finding myself in an unfamiliar environment on at least two occasions.  If I had known the appropriate etiquette, I could have been spared much embarrassment.  So to save you, my friends, from suffering the same awkward moments at work, I’m offering you these Office Behavior Etiquette Tips:

Choose humor over swearing.

When conversing, give co-workers a respectable distance of 15 inches.

Smile often and acknowledge them as a sign of respect. 

Cell Phones:

Screen your calls using caller ID.  Set your phone to vibrate and let voice mail pick up.

Anticipate potential callers and call them first — before work.

Never answer your phone when you’re in a meeting.  If it’s life and death urgent, leave the meeting.  Go out of the room, and speak quietly if you really must take the call.

Don’t make your phone visible on a desk or a lunch table.

When you do eat with others, chew wisely and while they are talking instead of when you are talking.

These rules of office etiquette come from:   http://ca.askmen.com/money/professional_150/161_professional_life.html

Yours truly,

Margaret Jean.

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Employers and Autism: Why Would I Hire a Person With Asperger’s??

Want the best person for the job?  Someone focused, methodical, honest and reliable?  You could be looking for someone on the autism spectrum.

According to a bulletin from the National Autistic Society Northern Ireland and the Department for Employment and Learning (N. Ireland), people on the autism spectrum have some stellar qualities to offer.

“People with autism can make effective and highly valued employees,” the article begins.

“As is the case with all employees, it’s important to match the person’s particular skills to the requirements of the post.”

“People with autism are often very focused and have considerable skills in specific areas.”

“Some of the transferable skills include: attention to detail, a methodical approach, strong research skills,  good long term memory and excellent record-keeping.”

For more information on this topic, see:  http://www.equalityni.org/archive/pdf/Employingpeoplewithautism.pdf

Why not hire a person with Asperger’s?

Yours truly,

Margaret Jean.

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